Zinkgruvan

Zinkgruvan

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Zinkgruvan

Zinkgruvan zinc mine

Zinkgruvan

Show map of Örebro

Zinkgruvan

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Coordinates: 58°49′N 15°05′E / 58.817°N 15.083°E / 58.817; 15.083Coordinates: 58°49′N 15°05′E / 58.817°N 15.083°E / 58.817; 15.083

Country
Sweden

Province
Närke

County
Örebro County

Municipality
Askersund Municipality

Area[1]

 • Total
2.25 km2 (0.87 sq mi)

Population (31 December 2010)[1]

 • Total
391

 • Density
174/km2 (450/sq mi)

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

 • Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

Zinkgruvan is a locality situated in Askersund Municipality, Örebro County, Sweden. It had 391 inhabitants in 2010.[1]
It is situated close to Sweden’s second largest lake, Vättern. The village is famous for its mining industry started by the Belgian company Vieille Montagne in 1857, hence the name Zinkgruvan (literally “the zinc mine” in English). Zinkgruvan was founded around the mine in the 1860s, and the history of the village is closely tied to the history of the mine. The people living in Zinkgruvan are mostly mine workers.
Zinkgruvan also contains several ski facilities, including an illuminated cross country ski track. The ski association in Zinkgruvan uses snow cannons to ensure that the ski-track is provided with snow during the entire winter. An old ice hockey rink in the village is filled with ice in the winter for public entertainment. Zinkgruvan is home to a museum that documents the history of the mining industry in the town.
Geography[edit]
In addition to Vättern, the area around Zinkgruvan contains several minor lakes. Zinkgruvan, as many small villages in Sweden, is popular with German tourists during the summer. Tourist attractions include the natural surroundings of the town and the elk that live nearby. Selling accessories and souvenirs to tourists is a major source of income for residents of Zinkgruvan. The headframe of the mine, containing the elevators that move miners and ore in the mine shaft, is a major landmark in the village and is well over 70m high. While some residents regard it as a unique feature of the town, it has been criticized for its Soviet-style architecture.
References[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Zinkgruvan.

^ a b c “Tätorternas landareal, folkmängd och invånare per km2 2005 och 2010” (in Swedish). Statistics Sweden. 14 December 2011. Archived from the origi
밤전

List of offshore wind farms in Japan

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This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries.
This is a list of operational, offshore wind farms in Japan (within the national maritime boundaries).

Contents

1 List
2 List of projects
3 See also
4 Notes

List[edit]

Wind farm
Prefecture
Wind turbine model
Unit power (MW)
No. of Units
Total (MW)
Commissioning date
Developer
Owner / operator
Coordinates
Notes and references

Setana Wind Farm
Hokkaido Prefecture
Vestas V47
0.6 MW
2
1.2 MW

Close to shore [1]

Sakata Offshore Wind Farm
Yamagata Prefecture
Vestas V80
2.0 MW
8 (3 onshore)
16 MW

[2]

Wind Power Kamisu
Ibaraki Prefecture
Subaru 80
2 MW
7
14 MW

Close to shore, survived exposure to the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.[3][4][5]

Fukushima Floating Wind Turbine
Fukushima Prefecture

2 MW
1
2 MW
November 2013

[6][7]

List of projects[edit]

Wind farm project
Prefecture
Wind turbine model
Unit power (MW)
No. of Units
Total (MW)
Commissioning date
Developer
Owner / operator
Coordinates
Notes and references

Kitakyushu
Fukuoka Prefecture

44

Kyuden Mirai

Cost 175bn yen ($1.5bn) [8]

See also[edit]

Energy portal
Japan portal

Wind power in Japan
List of wind farms
List of offshore wind farms
Lists of offshore wind farms by country
Wind power

Notes[edit]

^ “Offshore wind farms planned,” Japan Times, May 9, 2010; retrieved 13 Dec 2010; Kawasaki Heavy Industries, “Japan’s First Offshore Wind Power System Delivered to Hokkaido”
^ “Datasheet for Sakata Offshore Wind Farm”. LORC Knowledge. 2011-03-14. Retrieved 2011-07-04. 
^ 4C Offshore site page, accessed 11 February 2011
^ “First domestic open sea wind power plant starts operation,” Denki Shimbun. July 23, 2010.[dead link]
^ Wood, Elisa (2011-05-25). “The Dangers of Energy Generation”. Renewable Energy World. Archived from the original on 2011-06-03. 
^ Elaine Kurtenbach. “Japan starts up offshore wind farm near Fukushima” The Sydney Morning Herald, 12 November 2013. Accessed: 11 November 2013.
^ Fukushima Forward pamphlet
^ “Japanese land $1.5bn offshore gig”. reNEWS – Renewable Energy News. 17 February 2017. Retrieved 20 February 2017. 

Pheidole diffidens

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Pheidole diffidens

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Arthropoda

Class:
Insecta

Order:
Hymenoptera

Family:
Formicidae

Subfamily:
Myrmicinae

Tribe:
Pheidolini

Genus:
Pheidole

Species:
P. diffidens

Binomial name

Pheidole diffidens
(Walker, 1859)

Pheidole diffidens is a species of ants in the subfamily Myrmicinae. It is found in Sri Lanka.
References[edit]

External links[edit]

“Pheidole diffidens – Facts”. AntWeb. Retrieved 19 January 2014. 
“Pheidole diffidens”.  at antwiki.org
Animaldiversity.org

This Myrmicinae-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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분당오피

Janis Coppin

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This article relies largely or entirely upon a single source. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please help improve this article by introducing citations to additional sources. (February 2010)

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Janis Coppin

Personal information

Date of birth
(1988-05-11) 11 May 1988 (age 28)

Place of birth
Belgium

Height
1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)

Playing position
Striker

Club information

Current team

Coxyde

Number
9

Youth career

0000–2006
Germinal Beerschot

2006–2007
Roeselare

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

2007–2009
Zulte Waregem
19
(3)

2009–2010
Mons
22
(4)

2010–2013
Dender EH
90
(27)

2013–2015
KM Torhout
64
(29)

2015–
Coxyde
7
(1)

National team

2009
Belgium U21
1
(0)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 16 October 2015 (UTC).

Janis Coppin (born 11 May 1988) is a Belgian professional football striker who plays for Coxyde in the Belgian Second Division. From 2007 to 2009 he played for Zulte Waregem, before moving to Mons.
References[edit]

Guardian Football
Belgium stats at Belgian FA
Janis Coppin on Soccerway

This biographical article related to association football in Belgium, about a forward, is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Stockholm Ring Road

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Stockholm ring road according to the 1992 plan

Essingeleden

Södra länken

Norra länken

The Stockholm Ring Road (Swedish: Stockholms ringled) is a half-completed ring road around central Stockholm, Sweden. There have been many plans over the years of a ring road around central Stockholm, but all of them have been cancelled at some point. As of 2015[update], three quarters of the ring road have been built.
History[edit]
The first plan to build a motorway ring road around central Stockholm arose in the 1950s. The recent ring road project in Stockholm has its origin in the Dennis Agreement (Dennisöverenskommelsen) from 1992, which was a political agreement (negotiated by the Bank of Sweden governor Bengt Dennis) to build new roads and improve public transport in and around Stockholm. As the agreement was eventually broken in 1997 due to criticism from environmental groups and the political parties left outside the agreement, the future of a complete ring road became uncertain.[1]
A possibility of a ring road being completed arose in the mid-2000s, as the construction of the northern section resumed during 2006 with preparatory work, the final appeals against construction were rejected on February 26, 2007 by the Supreme Administrative Court.[2] Actual construction of the road resumed on May 11, 2007,[3] and the project was finally completed in 2015, save for a northbound exit which is planned in 2016. A new feasibility study was conducted on the eastern section in 2006.[4] A second shorter study, looking at a deeper tunnel with less impact on the surface during construction, was conducted in 2015, and is currently awaiting political blessing.
Road sections[edit]
There are four distinct sections of the planned ring road around Stockholm, of which two are completed, one in construction, and one under consideration.

Essingeleden, the western section — completion of various stages between 1966 and 1971.
Södra länken, the southern section — short section opened 1973, inauguration of the completed road 2004
Norra länken, the northern section — short section opened in 1991, construction of the rest halted in 1997, construction resumed 2006–2007,[3][5] and the road tunnel was opened in 2014.[6]
Österleden, the eastern section — planning cancelled in 1997. New feasibility study completed in 2006,[4] second study in 2015. Estimates for construction start in 2020 and completion in 2030.[7]

References[edit]

^ Malmsten, Bo; Pers

Finger-Tatuk Provincial Park

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Finger-Tatuk Provincial Park is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada. Established in 1999, it covers 17,151 hectares (42,380 acres) and includes Finger Lake and Tatuk Lake, as well as several smaller lakes (Bodley, Cory, Harp, Turff, and Vance) and archaeological sites once used by Dakelh (Carrier) First Nations peoples.[1] The lakes are known for rainbow trout and kokanee salmon, and each of the two larger lakes has a resort.[2]
References[edit]

^ Finger-Tatuk Provincial Park, BC Parks (accessed 2016-03-29).
^ “Fishing Across Canada 1998”, Field & Stream, April 1998, p. 71.

External links[edit]

Finger-Tatuk Provincial Park: Purpose Statement and Zoning Plan (March 2003)

Coordinates: 53°29′38″N 124°12′58″W / 53.494°N 124.216°W / 53.494; -124.216

This British Columbia protected areas related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Arksey railway station

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Arksey

Location

Place
Arksey

Area
Doncaster

Coordinates
53°33′06″N 1°07′59″W / 53.551550°N 1.133150°W / 53.551550; -1.133150Coordinates: 53°33′06″N 1°07′59″W / 53.551550°N 1.133150°W / 53.551550; -1.133150

Grid reference
SE575064

Operations

Original company
Great Northern Railway

Pre-grouping
Great Northern Railway

Post-grouping
London and North Eastern Railway

Platforms
2

History

6 June 1848
Station opens as Stockbridge

December 1850
Station renamed Arksey and Stockbridge

September 1854
Station renamed Arksey

5 August 1952
Station closes

Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom

Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z

UK Railways portal

Arksey railway station, originally named Stockbridge and later Arksey and Stockbridge was a station which served the villages of Arksey and Stockbridge in the English county of South Yorkshire. It was served by trains on the main line between Doncaster and York.

Contents

1 History
2 The site today
3 References
4 External links

History[edit]
The station was opened by the Great Northern Railway and became part of the London and North Eastern Railway during the Grouping of 1923, passing on to the Eastern Region of British Railways during the nationalisation of 1948. It was then closed by British Railways on 5 August 1952.[1]
The site today[edit]
Trains still pass at speed on the now electrified East Coast Main Line.
References[edit]

^ Burgess, Neil (2014). The Lost Railways of Yorkshire’s West Riding;The Central Section. Catrine: Stenlake. p. 83. ISBN 9781840336573. 

R.V.J.Butt, (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations. Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-85260-508-1. 
A. Jowett, (2000). Jowett’s Nationalised Railway Atlas. Atlantic Publishing. ISBN 0-906899-99-0. 

External links[edit]

Station on navigable O.S. map Station site is at centre of map

Preceding station
Historical railways
Following station

Doncaster
 
Great Northern Railway
East Coast Main Line
 
Joan Croft Halt
Line open. Station closed

Doncaster
 
Great Northern Railway /
Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway
Askern Branch Line
 
Askern
Line open. Station closed

This article on a railway station in Yorkshire and the Humber is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Popular culture

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“Pop Culture” redirects here. For the Madeon song, see Pop Culture (song).
Popular culture or pop culture is the entirety of ideas, perspectives, attitudes, images, and other phenomena that are within the mainstream of a given culture, especially Western culture of the early to mid 20th century and the emerging global mainstream of the late 20th and early 21st century. Heavily influenced by mass media, this collection of ideas permeates the everyday lives of the society. The most common pop culture categories are: entertainment (movies, music, television, games), sports, news (as in people/places in news), politics, fashion/clothes, technology, and slang.[1] Popular culture has a way of influencing an individual’s attitudes towards certain topics.[2]
Popular culture is often viewed as being trivial and “dumbed down” in order to find consensual acceptance throughout the mainstream. As a result, it comes under heavy criticism from various non-mainstream sources (most notably religious groups and countercultural groups) which deem it superficial, consumerist, sensationalist, and/or corrupt.[3][4][5][6][7]

Contents

1 History and definitions

1.1 Folklore

2 See also
3 Notes
4 References
5 Further reading
6 External links

History and definitions[edit]
The term “popular culture” was coined in the 19th century or earlier.[8] Traditionally, popular culture was associated with poor education and the lower classes,[9] as opposed to the “official culture” and higher education of the upper classes.[10][11]
The stress in the distinction from “official culture” became more pronounced towards the end of the 19th century,[12][need quotation to verify] a usage that became established by the interbellum period.[13][need quotation to verify]
From the end of World War II, following major cultural and social changes brought by mass media innovations, the meaning of popular culture began to overlap with those of mass culture, media culture, image culture, consumer culture, and culture for mass consumption.[14] Social and cultural changes in the United States were a pioneer in this with respect to other western countries.
The abbreviated form “pop” for popular, as in pop music, dates from the late 1950s.[15] Although terms “pop” and “popular” are in some cases used interchangeably, and their meaning partially overlap, the term “pop” is narrower. Pop is specific of something containing qualities of mass appeal, while “popular” refers to what has gained popularity, regard

Los Olvidados (disambiguation)

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This disambiguation page contains the primary topic and one other topic for the ambiguous title. Please expand it by adding additional topics to which the title can refer. If no other topics can be found within a reasonable time, the disambiguation page might be deleted. Also consider adding the {{look from}} and {{in title}} templates to assist searches for the term in other articles’ titles. (February 2017)

Los Olvidados may refer to:

Los Olvidados, a film by Luis Buñuel
Los Olvidados (punk band), a San Jose, California, USA skate punk band

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Los Olvidados.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.